Kingfisher

Brexit Disclosures

As the Brexit uncertainty continues, we look at how Brexit has been disclosed in a sample of FTSE 350 annual report and accounts.

As things currently stand, ‘exit day’ is still scheduled to be on 29 March 2019, although the likelihood of this date slipping appears to be increasing. The Government has issued the statutory instrument (SI 2019/145), Accounts and Reports (Amendment) (EU Exit) Regulations 2018, which effectively cuts the UK’s ties with the EEA (European Economic Area). The changes proposed will be made to the Companies Act 2006 and secondary legislation, making EEA states third countries under UK law. The Government has also issued another SI The Statutory Auditors and Third Country Auditors(Amendment) (EU Exit) Regulations 2019 dealing with statutory auditors and third country auditors. 

The Government has issued a number of additional pieces of guidance on how companies should operate in the event of a no-deal Brexit occurring on 29 March, on topics ranging from competition, insolvency and intellectual property, to the recognition of professional qualifications.

The Financial Reporting Council (FRC) and the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS) have published letters for auditors and accountants to share information in case there is no deal for leaving the EU by Friday 29 March 2019.

It remains to be seen when these changes will actually come into force, and if further discussions with the European Union will change proposals that have been made. Needless to say our technical team will follow developments closely and ensure legislation and commentaries on the Croner-i Tax and Accounting platform are updated as soon as possible.

UK Corporate Governance Code

Corporate governance has faced immense scrutiny recently following the high-profile collapses of BHS in 2016 and Carillion in January 2018, with MPs, the media and the public blaming the actions of the directors and auditors and all asking the same question… where was the board?

MPs, shareholders and the public have also been asking how effective the Financial Reporting Council’s (FRC) Corporate Governance Code has been in deterring poor corporate governance at the UK’s largest companies, following a raft of corporate failures. In July 2018 the FRC released a new UK Corporate Governance Code, (the Code) for listed companies in the UK. It also issued an update on its Guidance on Board Effectiveness. The Code is applicable to all companies with a premium listing, whether incorporated in the UK or elsewhere.

The new Code applies to accounting periods beginning on or after 1 January 2019, so with that in mind, this Common Practices report looks at how companies have been reporting on the current Code. We look at some good examples of reporting and look at the “explanations” made regarding compliance with the Code. We also discuss what’s new in the 2018 Code to enable readers to prepare for the upcoming changes.

The annual reports of 25 UK listed companies with year-ends between 31 December 2017 and 30 September 2018 were selected at random for review, across a range of industries. The full list of sample companies detailing company name, period end, auditor and industry classification can be found at the end of this report.

Kingfisher plc Monitor

Kingfisher plc Annual Report 2018
CR Monitor Issue: 
2019/0122
Company covered: 
Kingfisher plc
Period End: 
31 January, 2018
Report issued on 31 January 2019 covered the following practice issues:
Pronouncements
Extended disclosure in respect of the expected future impacts of new accounting standards including IFRS 9 "Financial instruments", IFRS 15 "Revenues from contracts with customers", and IFRS 16 "Leases".
Change
Discussion of key audit matters in the audit report refined including concentration on the impairment testing of French operations.
Change
Detailed disclosure in respect of business acquisition made during the year.
Change
Disclosure of post balance sheet restructuring plan.
Change
Recognition of a tangible fixed asset impairment reversal.

Segment Reporting

The requirement to disclose information on operating segments has been around for a number of years, firstly under IAS 14 Segment Reporting, and currently under IFRS 8 Operating Segments which has been applicable for entities with publicly traded debt or equity instruments (or those which are about to publicly trade) since 2009.
 
This report looks at the operating segment disclosures in the consolidated financial statements of 20 UK listed companies selected at random.
 

Kingfisher PLC Monitor

Kingfisher PLC Annual Report 2017
CR Monitor Issue: 
2018/0114
Company covered: 
Kingfisher PLC
Period End: 
31 January, 2017
Report issued on 30 January 2018 covered the following practice issues:
Pronouncements
Extended disclosure on the impacts of IFRS 15, IFRS 16 and IFRS 9.
Change
Auditors' report enhanced by inclusion of a tabular summary of the audit approach.
Change
Disclosure of non-GAAP measures extended to include underlying as well as adjusted measures.
Change
Reconciliation of movements in provisions shows release of an unused amount following changes to restructuring plans.
New
Fair value gains recycled from other comprehensive income form part of profit on disposal.
Restatement
Analysis of deferred tax assets and liabilities by type restated to reflect more appropriate allocation of balances.

Fair value measurement information under IFRS

IFRS 13 “Fair value measurement” sets out a single consistent framework for measuring fair value within IFRS financial statements and outlines a standardised set of disclosures in respect of fair value measurements. IFRS 13 has been mandatory now for some years, with application being required for annual reporting periods beginning on or after 1 January 2013. This report sets out the results of how requirements of the standard have been put into practice, both in terms of measurement and disclosure, in the consolidated financial statements of 139 large public limited companies with year ends between 31 March 2016 and 1 April 2017. It is not an exhaustive study of all aspects of IFRS 13 application and its conclusions are limited to our findings in respect of the areas analysed within the financial statements reviewed.

Disclosure of the impacts of IFRS 16 "Leases"

IFRS 16 “Leases” will fundamentally change accounting by lessees as it requires assets previously off balance sheet under operating lease arrangements to be brought on balance sheet as is currently the case for finance leased assets. As a result on application companies will recognise both additional assets and additional liabilities. Consequently there will also be knock on effects in the income statement as operating lease charges are replaced by a depreciation charge and a finance expense. This report analyses the financial statements of a range of companies to firstly establish whether there has been any early adoption and secondly to establish what companies are disclosing in respect of IFRS 16 and its future impacts.

Operating Lease disclosures under IFRS

This report sets out our findings in respect of a review of the operating lease disclosures when acting as lessee of 35 companies listed on the London stock exchange. We consider a number of points including the disclosure, as currently governed under IFRS by IAS 17 “Leases”, of total future minimum lease payments focusing on the assets identified and the time periods presented; disclosure of minimum sublease payments expected to be received; disclosure of lease and sublease payments recognised in the period; and disclosure of the general terms of significant leasing arrangements including contingent rent payable basis, the existence and terms of renewal or purchase options and escalation clauses and restrictions imposed by lease arrangements such as those concerning dividends, additional debt and further leasing. 

Kingfisher plc Interims Monitor

Interim Financial Report
CR Interim Monitor Issue: 
2015/1107
Period End: 
01 August 2015
Listing Status: 
FTSE 100
ICB Industry Classification: 
5375 Home Improvement Retailers
Auditor: 
Deloitte
Pronouncements
Adoption of levies interpretation affects timing of recognition of liabilities.
New
30% interest in business classed as financial asset after gain on disposal of 70% controlling interest.